Total Dietary Fiber Assay Kit

The Total Dietary Fiber test kit is suitable for the measurement and analysis of Total Dietary Fiber.

Product Code
Content/Size
Stock
Price
Qty
K-TDFR-100A
100 assays
$245.00
K-TDFR-200A
200 assays
$395.00

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Validation of Methods
Certification

AACC Method 32-05.01
AACC Method 32-06.01
AACC Method 32-07.01
AACC Method 32-21.01

Certification

CODEX Method Type I

Certification

AOAC Method 985.29
AOAC Method 991.42
AOAC Method 991.43
AOAC Method 993.19

For the determination of Total Dietary Fiber in cereal products,
foodstuffs, feeds and other materials

Principle:
         (α-amylase + amyloglucosidase)
(1) Starch + H2O → D-glucose

                       (protease)
(2) Protein + H2O → peptides

(3) Dietary fiber determined gravimetrically following alcohol
     precipitation


(4) Ash and residual protein determined on DF residues
     and subtracted

Kit size:                              100 / 200 assays
Method:                              Hydrolysis / removal of non-dietary
                                           fibre components
Total assay time:                ~ 100 min
Detection limit:                   0.5-100% of sample weight
Application examples:
Food ingredients, food products and other materials
Method recognition:   
AOAC (Methods 985.29, 991.42, 991.43 and 993.19), AACC
(Methods 32-05.01, 32-06.01, 32-07.01 and 32-21.01) and
CODEX (Type I Method)

Advantages

  • Very competitive price (cost per test)  
     
  • All reagents stable for > 2 years
     
  • High purity / standardised enzymes employed
     
  • Mega-Calc™ software tool is available from our website for hassle-free raw data processing
     
  • Simple format

Total Dietary Fiber Assay Kit, for the measurement and analysis of total, soluble and insoluble dietary fiber according to AOAC and AACC approved methods. See General Referee Reports: Journal of AOAC INTERNATIONAL, Vol. 81, No. 1, 1998. 

Fiber is a mixture of complex organic substances, including hydrophilic compounds, such as soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and non-digestable oligosaccharides, as well as a range of non-swellable, more or less hydrophobic, compounds such as cutins, suberins and lignins. The procedures for the determination and analysis of total dietary fiber as outlined in our booklet are based on the methods of Lee et al.1 and Prosky et al.2,3 (AOAC 991.43, AOAC 985.29, AACC 32-07.01 and AACC 32-05.01). However, the enzymes in the Megazyme Total Dietary Fiber Kit can also be used in other dietary fiber analytical methods such as AACC Method 32-21.01 and AACC Method 32-06.01.

1. Association of Official Analytical Chemists. (1985). Official Methods of Analysis, 14th ed., 1st suppl. Secs. 43, A14-43, A20, p.399.

2. Association of Official Analytical Chemists. (1986). Changes in methods. J. Assoc. Off. Anal. Chem., 69, 370.

3. Association of Official Analytical Chemists. (1987). Changes in methods. J. Assoc. Off. Anal. Chem., 70, 393.

Two separate methods are described in the associated data booklet:

METHOD 1:

DETERMINATION OF TOTAL, SOLUBLE AND INSOLUBLE DIETARY FIBER

Based on AOAC Method 991.43 “Total, Soluble, and Insoluble Dietary Fiber in Foods” (First Action 1991) and AACC Method 32-07.01 “Determination of Soluble, Insoluble, and Total Dietary Fiber in Foods and Food Products” (Final Approval 10-16-91).

METHOD 2:

DETERMINATION OF TOTAL DIETARY FIBER

Based on AACC method 32-05.01 and AOAC Method 985.29.

Measurement of dietary fibre components: the importance of enzyme purity, activity and specificity.

McCleary, B. V. (2001), “Advanced Dietary Fibre Technology”, (B. V. McCleary and L. Prosky, Eds.), Blackwell Science, Oxford, U.K., pp. 89-105.

Measuring dietary fibre.

McCleary, B. V. (1999). The World of Ingredients, 50-53.

Enzyme purity and activity in fibre determinations.

McCleary, B. V. (1999). Cereal Foods World, 44, 590-596.

Importance of enzyme purity and activity in the measurement of total dietary fibre and dietary fibre components.

McCleary, B. V. (2000). Journal of AOAC International, 83(4), 997-1005.

Two issues in dietary fiber measurement.

McCleary, B. V. (2001). Cereal Foods World, 46(4), 164-165.

Dietary fibre analysis.

McCleary, B. V. (2003). Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, 62, 3-9.

Measurement of novel dietary fibres.

McCleary, B. V. & Rossiter, P. (2004). Journal of AOAC International, 87(3), 707-717.

Measurement of total dietary fiber using AOAC method 2009.01 (AACC International approved method 32-45.01): Evaluation and updates.

McCleary, B. V., Sloane, N., Draga, A. & Lazewska, I. (2013). Cereal Chemistry, 90(4), 396-414.

An integrated procedure for the measurement of total dietary fibre (including resistant starch), non-digestible oligosaccharides and available carbohydrates.

McCleary, B. V. (2007). Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 389(1), 291-308.

Development and evaluation of an integrated method for the measurement of total dietary fibre.

McCleary, B. V., Mills, C. & Draga, A. (2009). Quality Assurance and Safety of Crops & Foods, 1(4), 213–224.

Determination of total dietary fiber (CODEX definition) by enzymatic-gravimetric method and liquid chromatography: collaborative study.

McCleary, B. V., DeVries, J. W., Rader, J. I., Cohen, G., Prosky, L., Mugford, D. C., Champ, M. & Okuma, K. (2010). Journal of AOAC International, 93(1), 221-233.

Determination of insoluble, soluble, and total dietary fiber (codex definition) by enzymatic-gravimetric method and liquid chromatography: Collaborative Study.

McCleary, B. V., DeVries, J. W., Rader, J. I., Cohen, G., Prosky, L., Mugford, D. C., Champ, M. & Okuma, K. (2012). Journal of AOAC International, 95(3), 824-844.

Modification to AOAC Official Methods 2009.01 and 2011.25 to allow for minor overestimation of low molecular weight soluble dietary fiber in samples containing starch.

McCleary, B. V. (2014). Journal of AOAC International, 97(3), 896-901.

The influence of germination conditions on beta-glucan, dietary fibre and phytate during the germination of oats and barley.

Hübner, F., O’Neil, T., Cashman, K. D. & Arendt, E. K. (2010). European Food Research and Technology, 231(1), 27-35.

The Choice of Nutritionally Lucrative Flour Streams from Barley Milling Flow.

Velebna, N., Slukova, M., Honcu, I. & Prihoda, J. (2012). Procedia Engineering, 42, 1855-1862.

Mushrooms of genus Pleurotus as a source of dietary fibres and glucans for food supplements.

Synytsya, A., Míčková, K., Jablonský, I., Sluková, M. & Čopíková, J. (2008). Czech Journal of Food Sciences, 26(6), 441-446.

Insoluble fiber-rich fractions derived from Averrhoa carambola: hypoglycemic effects determined by in vitro methods.

Chau, C. F., Chen, C. H. & Lin, C. Y. (2004). LWT-Food Science and Technology, 37(3), 331-335.

Effects of process variables and addition of polydextrose and whey protein isolate on the properties of barley extrudates.

Kirjoranta, S., Solala, K., Suuronen, J. P., Penttilä, P., Peura, M., Serimaa, R., Tenkanen M. & Jouppila, K. (2012). International Journal of Food Science & Technology, 47(6), 1165-1175.

Elimination of resistant starch type II within the framework of total starch and dietary fibre analysis by microwave irradiation.

Themeier, H., Hollmann, J., Neese, U. & Lindhauer, M. G. (2010). Quality Assurance and Safety of Crops & Foods, 2(1), 46-51.

The influence of germination conditions on beta-glucan, dietary fibre and phytate during the germination of oats and barley.

Hübner, F., O’Neil, T., Cashman, K. D. & Arendt, E. K. (2010). European Food Research and Technology, 231(1), 27-35.

Hypocholesterolemic activity of buckwheat flour is mediated by increasing sterol excretion and down-regulation of intestinal NPC1L1 and ACAT2.

Yang, N., Li, Y. M., Zhang, K., Jiao, R., Ma, K. Y., Zhang, R., Ren G. & Chen, Z. Y. (2014). Journal of Functional Foods, 6, 311-318.

Dietary fibre fractions in cereal foods measured by a new integrated AOAC method.

Hollmann, J., Themeier, H., Neese, U. & Lindhauer, M. G. (2013). Food Chemistry, 140(3), 586-589.

Wheat bread biofortification with rootlets, a malting by‐product.

Waters, D. M., Kingston, W., Jacob, F., Titze, J., Arendt, E. K. & Zannini, E. (2013). Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, 93(10), 2372-2383.

The effect of hazelnut roasted skin from different cultivars on the quality attributes, polyphenol content and texture of fresh egg pasta.

Zeppa, G., Belviso, S., Bertolino, M., Cavallero, M. C., Bello, B. D., Ghirardello, D., Giorgis, M., Grosso, A., Rolle, L., & Gerbi, V. (2015). Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, 95(8), 1678-1688.

Assessment of Nutritional Quality of Developed Faba Bean (Vicia faba L.) Lines.

Singh, A. K., Bhardwaj, R. & Singh, I. S. (2014). Journal of AgriSearch, 1(2), 96-101.

Characteristics of destarched corn fiber extrudates for ethanol production.

Myat, L. & Ryu, G. H. (2014). Journal of Cereal Science, 60(2), 289-296.

The effects of bread‐making process factors on Australian sweet lupin‐wheat bread quality characteristics.

Villarino, C. B., Jayasena, V., Coorey, R., Chakrabarti‐Bell, S. & Johnson, S. (2014). International Journal of Food Science & Technology, 49(11), 2373-2381.

Effects of fermented and extruded wheat bran on total tract apparent digestibility of nutrients, minerals and energy in growing pigs.

Kraler, M., Schedle, K., Domig, K. J., Heine, D., Michlmayr, H. & Kneifel, W. (2014). Animal Feed Science and Technology, 197, 121-129.

Q1. Should the pH of the sample be adjusted even for samples in acidic media?

Q2. What is the stability of enzymes for Total Dietary Fibre method?

Q3. I was wondering if Megazyme has a kit to determine insoluble and soluble dietary fibre in barley?

Q4. Are the lower temperatures of 90˚C to 95˚C adequate for the hydrolysis if we extend the incubation time?

Q5. Is it necessary to do simultaneously nitrogen and ash analysis or can the test be applied to samples already analysed for these two characters?

Q6. There is an issue with the performance of the kit; the results are not as expected.

Q7. Is there a preferred rate of heating and cooling for the recommended crucible (Corning® No. 32940-50C or equivalent) to avoid breakages?

Q8. How should I prepare the required 78% ethanol solution?